Is my baby eating enough?mom and baby looking at eachother

Did you know it’s normal for your baby to lose weight the first few days after birth? It is! Babies may be born with extra fluid on board (especially if mom had IV fluids during labor) and full of meconium (the thick, black, tarry first few poops). When these pass through, the baby does lose some weight; so, some weight loss is normal.

When should we be concerned? If a baby has lost 7% of his/her birth weight we need to take a look at the feeding. Is baby latched on correctly? Is baby breastfeeding effectively and able to transfer/move breastmilk from mom’s breast to baby’s tummy?  Is baby sleeping at the breast and not sucking? Call your WIC office if you need more help. 10% is a red flag and too much weight to lose – seek help from WIC’s lactation consultants at this point. You may need to supplement with formula and/or pump. We are here to help you through this.

Your baby should be back to his/her birth weight by 10 days to 2 weeks old. Once your baby is back to his/her birth weight expect an average weight gain for an exclusive breastfeed baby to be about 8 oz/week the first 2-3 months.

Any Fresno EOC WIC participant can come in during our normal business hours with their WIC ID folder to weigh their baby. 

Use this chart as a guide, but talk to your child's doctor if you are concerned about your child not getting enough milk.

Typical number of wet diapers and bowel movements in a baby's first week (it is fine if your baby has more): 1 day = 24 hours*

size of newborn stomach

Baby's age Number of wet diapers Number of bowel movements Texture and color of bowel movements
Day 1 (first 24 hours after birth) 1-2 The first bowel movement usually occurs within 8 hours after birth Thick, tarry, and black
Day 2 2 3 Thick, tarry, and black
Day 3 5-6 disposable,
6-8 cloth
3 Looser and greenish to yellow (color may vary)
Day 4 6 3 Soft, watery, and yellow
Day 5 6 3 Loose, seedy, and yellow
Day 6 6 3 Loose, seedy, and yellow
Day 7 6 3 Larger amounts of loose, seedy, and yellow

https://www.womenshealth.gov/breastfeeding/learning-breastfeed/making-breastmilk#11